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[[Datoteka:DDT.gif|mini|200x200px|Animirani potez DDT-a ]]
DDT je pokret ažurirani Jake "Zmija" Roberts i izvodi stavljanjem protivnika glavom pod ruku napadača na front facelock i onda padne natrag, raspršivanje protivnika glavom u mat.
 
<!--===Wheelbarrow bulldog===
This bulldog sees the opponent clutching the wrestler in a wheelbarrow bodyscissors. The wrestler then falls downwards while still scissoring their legs around the opponent's waist, and pushes by hitting their palms against the canvas. As they gets rebounded back to the opponent, the attacker releases their legs, quickly places their hand behind the opponent's head, and goes for a bulldog. The bulldog is usually one-handed rather than a headlock bulldog.
 
==Catapult==
A catapult or slingshot catapult is a throw that typically starts with the opponent on their back, and the wrestler standing and facing them. The wrestler hooks each of the opponent's legs in one of their arms, then falls backwards to slingshot the opponent into a turnbuckle, ladder, rope, mat, etc. This can also be held for a [[Backbreaker#Catapult backbreaker|backbreaker]].
 
==Chokeslam==
{{main|Chokeslam}}
A chokeslam is any body slam in which the wrestler grasps their opponent's neck, lifts them up, and slams them to the mat, causing them to land on their back. The move is used by numerous wrestlers, often larger ones who portray "monster" characters.
 
===Iron claw slam===
This move is performed in the same style as a [[chokeslam]], but instead the wrestler grabs the opponent with a [[Professional wrestling holds#Clawhold|clawhold]]. [[Erick Rowan|Rowan]] uses this move as a finisher and [[Lars Sullivan]] uses it as a signature.
 
===Armpit slam===
This move is performed in the same style as a [[chokeslam]], but instead the wrestler grabs the opponent by their armpit and slams them to the mat, causing them to land on their back.
 
==Cobra clutch slam==
In this slam a wrestler places the opponent in a [[Professional wrestling holds#Cobra clutch|cobra clutch]] and then lifts the opponent into the air by their neck before jumping backwards, falling face down or into a sitting position, driving the opponent back first down to the mat. This move is popularized by [[Ted DiBiase Jr.]], who named it the ''Dream Street''. [[Jinder Mahal]] uses this move calling it the ''Khallas''.
 
==DDT==
{{main|DDT (professional wrestling)|l1=DDT}}
[[File:DDT.gif|thumb|200px|Animated DDT move]]
The DDT is a move innovated by [[Jake Roberts|Jake "The Snake" Roberts]] and popularized by [[Tommy Dreamer]] and performed by putting the opponent's head underneath the attacker's arm in a [[Professional wrestling holds#Front facelock|front facelock]] and then falling back, driving the opponent's head into the mat.
 
==Driver==
A driver is a move in which the wrestler clutches the opponent's body in some form before falling into a sitout position while dropping the opponent on their back, neck, and/or shoulders.
 
===Cobra clutch driver===
The wrestler stands behind an opponent and applies a [[Professional wrestling holds#Cobra clutch|cobra clutch]] on their opponent, placing one of their hands against the opponent's neck after hooking the opponent's arm with it. He/she then scoops the opponent's near leg with their other arm and lifts the opponent up, flips the opponent upside down, and then either kneels or sits down, driving the opponent down to the mat on their neck. Another variation has the attacking wrestler apply a [[Professional wrestling holds#Pumphandle|pumphandle]] prior to executing this technique and is used by wrestlers like [[Jinder Mahal]].
 
===Electric chair driver===
Also known as a Joker Driver, In this variation of a driver, the wrestler lifts the opponent on their shoulders in an [[Professional wrestling holds#Electric chair|electric chair]] sitting position and then takes hold of the opponent and pulls him/her over their shoulder and down to the mat while falling to a sit out position so that the opponent lands on their upper back and neck between the legs of the wrestler, facing towards him/her, usually resulting in a pin. A one-handed variation is used by [[Kenny Omega]], known as ''One-Winged Angel''.
 
===Fisherman driver===
This move was innovated by [[Shiro Koshinaka]] and it was called as Samurai Driver '94 as finisher. The wrestler places the opponent in a [[Professional wrestling holds#Front facelock|front facelock]] and hooks one of the opponent's legs with their free arm. The wrestler then lifts the opponent upside down or on to their shoulders, and then sits down, driving the opponent between their legs, head and shoulder first. A wrist-clutch variation of this driver exists which sees the wrestler lift the opponent on to their shoulders, and while the opponent is on their shoulders, he/she uses the hand hooking the opponent's leg to reach upwards and clutch the wrist of the arm opposite the hooked leg. While maintaining the wrist-clutch, they then perform the driver. There is a further variation that does not include the shoulder lift that sees the wrestler hook the leg and wrist while the opponent is standing in front of him/her, lift the opponent upside down and then fall to the sitout position. This move was made popular by wrestler [[Low Ki]] who calls it the ''Ki Krusher''. A cross legged version is used by CIMA, who calls it the ''Perfect Driver''. [[Travis Banks]] also uses this move calling it the ''Kiwi Crusher''.
 
====Wrist-Clutch Fisherman Driver====
This variation involves grabbing and pulling by the opponent's wrist, then lifting them up into the air, before falling to their back, driving the opponent to the ground on the back of their head/neck. This was popularized by [[Shingo Takagi]] as ''The Last Falconry'', now used as ''The Last of the Dragon.''
 
===Half nelson driver===
This was invented by [[Kensuke Sasaki]]. The wrestler stands behind an opponent and applies a [[Professional wrestling holds#Half nelson|half nelson hold]] on their opponent, placing one of their hands against the opponent's neck after hooking the opponent's arm with it. They then scoop the opponent's near leg with their other arm and lift the opponent up, flip the opponent upside down, and then either kneel or sit down, driving the opponent down to the mat on their neck. Another variation has the attacking wrestler apply a [[Professional wrestling holds#Pumphandle|pumphandle]] prior to executing this technique. This variation has been used by [[Jordynne Grace]] (''Grace Driver''), [[Pentagón Jr.|Pénta El Zero M]] (''Pénta Driver''), [[Yoshi-Hashi]] (''Karma)'', [[Shingo Takagi]] (''MADE IN JAPAN'') and several other wrestlers.
[[File:Magnus vs. Christopher Daniels w Kazarian.jpg|thumb|[[Nick Aldis]] performing the Michinoku Driver II on [[Christopher Daniels]].]]
[[File:Ayako Hamada Driver.jpg|thumb|right|250px|[[Ayako Hamada]] performing a Michinoku Driver II on [[Daffney]].]]
 
===Michinoku Driver II===
Innovated by [[Taka Michinoku]], and technically known as a sitout scoop slam piledriver. Facing their opponent, the wrestler reaches between their opponent's legs with their right arm and reaches around the opponent's neck from the same side with their left arm. They then lift the opponent up and turn them around so that they are held upside down, as in a [[Professional wrestling throws#Scoop slam|scoop slam]], before dropping down into a sitout position, driving the opponent down to the mat neck and shoulder first. Many people call it the Michinoku Driver because it is used more often than [[Brainbuster#Double underhook brainbuster|the original Michinoku Driver]].
 
====Michinoku Driver II-B====
A variation of the Michinoku Driver II in which the wrestler stands behind the opponent, applies an [[Professional wrestling holds#Inverted facelock|inverted facelock]], lifts them upside down, and then drops down to a sitting position, driving the opponent down to the mat between the wrestler's legs upper back first. The move was also used by [[Vampiro]] with the name ''Nail in the Coffin''.
 
===Samoan driver===
The attacking wrestler drapes an opponent over their shoulders in a [[Professional wrestling holds#Fireman's carry|fireman's carry]] position and then takes hold of the opponent and pulls them over their shoulder and down to the mat while falling to a sitting position so that the opponent lands on their upper back and neck between the legs of the wrestler, facing towards them. A cross-legged and wrist-clutch version of this move also exists. It is used as finishing moves by wrestlers such as [[Chris Sabin]] (''Cradle Shock''), [[El Hijo del Fantasma|Santos Escobar]] (''Phantom Driver)'' and [[Su Yung|Susie]] (''Panic Switch'')
 
===Wheelbarrow driver===
Similar to the [[Facebuster#Wheelbarrow facebuster|wheelbarrow facebuster]] but instead of dropping their opponent face first, they drop their opponent so that the opponent lands on their upper back and neck between the legs of the wrestler, facing towards them, usually resulting in a pin.
 
==Electric chair drop==
The wrestler lifts the opponent on their shoulders in an [[Professional wrestling holds#Electric chair|electric chair]] sitting position and then falls backwards driving the opponent back-first into the mat. There is also a [[#Electric chair driver|driver]], a [[Facebuster#Electric chair facebuster|facebuster]] and a [[Suplex#Electric chair suplex|suplex]] variation of the move.
 
==Facebreaker==
A facebreaker is any move in which the wrestler slams their opponent's face against a part of the wrestler's body, usually the knee.
 
===Double knee facebreaker===
This facebreaker involves an attacking wrestler, who is standing face-to-face with an opponent, hooking both hands around the opponent's head and then leaping to bring both knees up to the face of the opponent. The wrestler then falls backwards to the mat, thus forcing the opponent to fall forwards and impact the exposed knees. The move was originated by Phillip Michael Grant, and later popularized by [[Chris Jericho]], who named it the ''Codebreaker''. [[Tetsuya Bushi|Bushi]] uses a diving variation called ''MX'' where he dives from the top rope to hit the double knee facebreaker. [[Liv Morgan|Liv Morgan's]] ''201 Facebreaker'' (formerly the ''Jersey Codebreaker'') is a variation where she stands 90 degrees from the opponent, and delivers the double knees or shins while she is landing.
 
===Inverted stomp facebreaker===
Also known as the ''Foot Stunner''. The user applies a [[Professional wrestling holds#Wrist lock|standing wrist lock]] on their opponent, then places their foot on the opponent's face and falls backwards, forcing the opponent's face into their foot. This move is used as a finishing move by [[Gail Kim]] (called ''Eat Defeat''), [[Chuck Taylor (wrestler)|Chuckie T]] (called ''Sole Food''), [[Xavier Woods]] (called ''Lost in the Woods'') and [[Enzo Amore]] of [[WWE]] recently started using this move as his finisher (called ''JawdonZo''). [[Colt Cabana]] used the move (calling it ''Eat The Feet'') and [[Mia Yim]] also uses it (called ''Seoul Food'') as her signature move.
 
===Knee smash facebreaker===
The move is a standard facebreaker which involves the wrestler facing an opponent and grabbing him or her by the head or hair and pulling the opponent's face down, dropping it on to the wrestler's knee. Often used by a wrestler to stun an opponent and set him or her up for another move. Many other facebreakers use the knee to inflict the damage; one variation sees the wrestler apply a [[Professional wrestling holds#Side headlock|standing side headlock]], and simultaneously pull the opponent forward and smash the wrestler's knee to the opponent's head.
 
===Shoulder facebreaker===
Also described as a hangman's facebreaker or an over the shoulder facebreaker, this facebreaker is performed when an attacking wrestler, who is standing in a back to back position with an opponent, reaches back to pull the opponent's head over their shoulder before (while keeping a hold of the opponent's head) spinning round to twist the opponent's head over as they drop down to one knee forcing the opponent face-first into the wrestlers exposed knee in one quick fluid motion.
 
===Single knee facebreaker===
Similar to the double knee facebreaker, but with only one knee. [[Shawn Spears]] used this move, calling it ''Perfect 10''. [[Ricochet]] uses this move, calling it ''Recoil''.
 
==Facebuster==
{{main|Facebuster}}
A facebuster, also known as a faceplant, is any move in which the wrestler forces their opponent's face down to the mat which does not involve a headlock or facelock.
 
==Fallaway slam==
[[File:Roxy vs. Kong vs. .jpg|thumb|250px|[[ODB (wrestler)|ODB]] performs a fallaway slam on [[Nicole Raczynski|Roxxi]].]]
Also known as a table-top suplex. The wrestler lifts the opponent up so the opponent is horizontal across the wrestler's body then falls backward, throwing the opponent over their head down to the mat back-first. This slam can be either [[Pin (professional wrestling)|bridged into a pin]], or the wrestler can float over into another fallaway slam. This move is sometimes used as a continuation move from catching the opponent's high-cross body, to emphasize the wrestler's strength.
 
===Fallaway moonsault slam===
This moves shows the wrestler grab an opponent like a fallaway slam but instead of just throwing them backwards the wrestler while, hanging onto the opponent, does a backflip slamming the opponent back first into the mat while landing on top of them chest first. The attacker may also chose maintain their hold on the opponent after the landing in an attempt to score a [[pinfall]]. This move was innovated by [[Scott Steiner]] and is currently used by [[Trevor Lee|Cameron Grimes]] primarily as a counter to a charging opponent performing a [[Professional wrestling attacks#Crossbody|running crossbody]]. This move requires a great deal of lower body strength and agility to perform as it can be dangerous to the wrestler performing the backflip as he/she can land head first and risk serious injury from failing to rotate properly.
 
==Fireman's carry throws==
{{main|Fireman's carry}}
A fireman's carry involves the wrestler holding the opponent in place over both shoulders. From this position, various throws can be performed.
 
===Death Valley driver{{anchor|Death Valley}}===
[[File:Derek Wylde and Scotty OShea.jpg|thumb|right|Derek Wylde executing a ''Death Valley driver'' which will put Scotty O'Shea (in green) through a table.]]
 
===Fireman's carry slam===
[[File:Barrett Wasteland.jpg|left|thumb|[[Wade Barrett]] preparing to perform a fireman's carry slam (''Wasteland'') on [[Randy Orton]]]]
 
===Fireman's carry takeover===
[[File:Cena FU Animated.gif|thumb|250px|[[John Cena]] performs an ''Attitude Adjustment'' (standing fireman's carry powerslam) on [[Kane (wrestler)|Kane]].]]
 
===Olympic slam===
The wrestler holds the opponent's wrist while putting their head underneath the opponent's chest, grabs the inside of one of the opponents legs, then lifts the opponent up onto their shoulders while falling backwards. This move was popularized by and named in reference to Olympic gold medalist [[Kurt Angle]], who also dubbed it the ''Angle Slam'' as an alternate name.<ref>WWE: The Rock: The Most Electrifying Man in Sports Entertainment ([https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00120LPQ0 Amazon DVD Link]) - Triple Threat Match featuring [[The Undertaker]], [[Dwayne Johnson|The Rock]], and [[Kurt Angle]] for the WWE Undisputed Championship</ref>
 
===Samoan drop===
[[File:JillianHall Samoan drop 1.jpg|thumb|[[Jillian Hall]] setting up to perform the Samoan drop on Xandra Bale.]]
 
===Pop-up===
Also called a "free-fall" or "push-up flapjack". A pop-up is a flapjack where the attacker, upon facing an opponent rushing towards them, flings the opponent vertically up into the air without holding on to the opponent. The standing attacker or the airborne opponent is free to carry out an attack after the pop-up. Examples of attacks from the standing wrestler include performing a [[Professional wrestling attacks#European uppercut|European uppercut]] to the falling opponent,<ref>{{cite web|title=ROH TV report|url=http://www.f4wonline.com/component/content/article/8801/|work=Wrestling Observer|access-date=5 November 2011}}</ref> or catching the opponent and then performing a [[Powerbomb#Sitout powerbomb|sitout powerbomb]].<ref>{{cite web|last=Radican|title=Radican's DGUSA internet PPV report 9/10: Complete coverage of DGUSA show from Chicago|url=http://www.pwtorch.com/artman2/publish/otherppvs/article_53168.shtml|work=Pro Wrestling Torch|access-date=5 November 2011}}</ref> Examples of attacks from the airborne opponent include executing a [[dropkick]] on the standing opponent.<ref>{{cite web|title=TNA Impact report: Ken Anderson has a new catchphrase, ODB reveals why she attacked Velvet Sky, Abyss continues his reign of terror over the X-Division, a new champion is crowned, RVD and Piter F Angle have their "first match ever" in the main event, and more|url=http://www.pwinsider.com/article/58359/ongoing-tna-impact-report.html?p=1|publisher=PWInsider|access-date=5 November 2011}}</ref>
 
==Full nelson==
[[File:Mason Ryan finisher.jpg|thumb|240px|[[Mason Ryan]] performing a full nelson slam on [[Curt Hawkins]]]]
 
===Full nelson slam===
In this move, the attacker places their opponent in a [[Nelson hold#Full nelson|full nelson hold]] and uses it to lift them off the ground. With the opponent in the air, the attacker removes one arm (so their opponent is now in a half nelson) and slams the opponent back-first into the mat. Another similar variation, known as a double chickenwing slam, sees the wrestler apply [[Professional wrestling holds#Double chickenwing|double chickenwing]] instead of a full nelson before slamming the opponent. [[Damien Sandow|Aron Stevens]] used the full nelson version
 
====Inverted full nelson slam====
Also known as the reverse full nelson slam, this variation sees the attacker tuck and slide their arms under the opponent's armpits and then clutch the opponent's lower jaw. Then, the attacker lifts the opponent before falling forward to slam the opponent back-first into the mat.
 
===Half nelson slam===
The wrestler stands behind, slightly to one side of and facing the opponent. The wrestler reaches under one of the opponent's arms with their corresponding arm and places the palm of their hand on the back of the opponent's neck, thereby forcing the arm of the opponent up into the air to complete the [[Professional wrestling holds#Half nelson|half nelson]]. The wrestler then lifts the opponent up, turns, and falls forward, slamming the opponent back-first into the mat.
 
==Giant swing==
[[File:Cesaro Swing.jpg|thumb|[[Cesaro (wrestler)|Cesaro]] performing the ''Cesaro Swing'' (giant swing) on [[Hunico|Sin Cara]]]]
A giant swing starts with an opponent lying on the mat, face up, and the wrestler at the opponent's feet. The wrestler takes the opponent's legs up under their arms, similar to the setup for a [[Professional wrestling throws#Catapult|catapult]], but instead pivots, spinning around to lift the opponent off the mat. The attacker may release the opponent to send them flying, or simply slow until the back of the opponent returns to the ground. WWE's [[Cesaro (wrestler)|Cesaro]] uses the giant swing as a signature move.
 
==Guillotine drop==
This move sees the attacking wrestler lift the opponent in a [[Professional wrestling holds#Guillotine choke|standing guillotine choke]] and drop the opponent to the mat, lower spine first. This causes an effect to the whole spine and neck. A variation involving a [[Professional wrestling holds#Butterfly|standing double underhook]] rather than the guillotine choke also exists. It is used by [[Angel Garza]] as the ''Wing Clipper.''
 
==Gorilla press==
Also known as a ''Military press'', the attack sees the wrestler lift their opponent up above their head with an [[overhead press]] as used in [[weight training|weight lifting]]. The attacking wrestler may repeatedly press the opponent overhead to show their strength prior to dropping them.
 
===Gorilla press drop===
The wrestler lifts their opponent up over their head with arms fully extended, then drops the opponent down face-first in front or back. This was the finisher for wrestlers [[Chyna]] and [[the Ultimate Warrior]]. It is a popular technique for very large wrestlers because it emphasizes their height and power.
 
===Gorilla press gutbuster===
A maneuver in which the user drops the opponent directly in front of them while putting their own knee out in front of them. The victim lands stomach or ribs first on the knee, made more impactful by the long drop.
 
===Gorilla press slam===
This slam sees a wrestler first lift their opponent up over their head with arms fully extended, before lowering the arm under the head of the opponent so that the opponent falls to that side, while flipping over and landing on their back. This move is also called the military press slam.
 
===Gorilla press spinebuster===
A gorilla press in which the user drops the opponent and turns them 90 degrees, dropping then onto their shoulder facing the opposite direction to the attacker, before being driven to the ground in a spinebuster maneuver. [[Bill Goldberg|Goldberg]] used the move as a signature.
 
==Gutbuster==
A gutbuster is any move in which the wrestler lifts their opponent up and jumps or drops him/her so that the opponent's stomach impacts against part of the wrestler's body, usually the knee. A basic gutbuster is often called a stomach breaker and is essentially the same as a [[Backbreaker#Pendulum backbreaker|backbreaker]] but with the opponent facing the opposite direction. This similarity with [[backbreaker]]s is reflected in almost every gutbuster variation, which if inverted would become backbreakers and vice versa.
 
===Elevated gutbuster===
[[File:Roderick Strong Gutbuster.jpg|thumb|right|[[Roderick Strong]] in the last moments of executing an elevated gutbuster on [[Davey Richards]]. This was transitioned from a fireman's carry, a common version of the gutbuster.]]
This variation of a gutbuster sees an opponent first elevated into a high lifting [[Professional wrestling holds#Transition holds|transition hold]] before being dropped down for a gutbuster. [[Taiji Ishimori]] uses a [[Underhook#Single underhook|Single underhook]] version of the move as his finisher calling it the ''Bloody Cross''.
 
====Fireman's carry gutbuster====
This is the most common version of the elevated gutbuster and sees the attacking wrestler first lift the opponent up across their shoulders; a position known as a [[Professional wrestling holds#Fireman's carry|fireman's carry]], before then dropping down to one knee while simultaneously elevating the opponent over their head forcing them to drop down and impact their exposed knee. Wrestler [[Kaitlyn (wrestler)|Kaitlyn]] uses this as one of her signature move. A slight variation of this uses a modified double knee gutbuster and sees the attacking wrestler drop down to their back while bringing ''both'' knees up for the opponent to land on. [[Darren Young]] used the move as his finisher calling it ''Gutcheck''. WNA wrestler Kyle Mckayal uses a jumping version of it as his second hand finisher calling it The Project Mckayal.
 
====Gutbuster drop====
An elevated gutbuster in which an attacking wrestler would lift an opponent up, stomach-first, across one of their shoulders before dropping down to their knees forcing the opponent's stomach to impact on the wrestler's shoulder.
 
===Rib breaker===
A rib breaker is a version of a gutbuster that involves the wrestler scooping the opponent up by reaching between the legs of the opponent with one arm and reaching around their back from the same side with their other arm. The wrestler then lifts their opponent up so they are horizontal across the wrestler's body. From here the wrestler drops down to one knee, forcing the opponent to drop stomach/rib-first against the wrestler's raised knee.
 
==Headlock takedown==
Also known as a spinning headlock takedown. This throw starts with the wrestler catching the opponent in a [[Professional wrestling holds#Side headlock|side headlock]]. The wrestler turns and twists their body so their back is horizontally against the opponent's torso. The wrestler turns to one side (depending on which hand is used to catch the opponent) while still catching the opponent with the headlock. Therefore, the opponent is slammed back-first into the mat after being almost "forcibly flipped" over the wrestler's back (as the wrestler turns to their sides).
 
===Headlock driver===
[[File:Ambrose Dirty Deeds.jpg|thumb|[[Dean Ambrose]] setting up his finisher ''Dirty Deeds'' (headlock driver) on [[The Miz]].]]
Similar to the [[#Snapmare driver|snapmare driver]], the wrestler applies a [[Professional wrestling holds#Side headlock|side headlock]] before dropping down on either their chest or their knees and driving the opponent's head down to the mat forehead first, with the side headlock. This was the original version of the finisher used by [[Dean Ambrose]], known as ''Dirty Deeds''. [[Ethan Carter III]] (EC3) uses this as his finisher and he calls it the ''One Percenter''. WWE superstar Bayley utilized this move during her indies days dubbing it the ''Rose Plant.'' She started using this move as a finisher.
 
==Headscissors takedown==
[[File:Gesprungene beinschere vovinam.jpg|thumb|200px|Flying Scissors to the neck, executed during the 2004 "Gio-To-Festival" in Minden, Germany.]]
The move is performed with the wrestler's legs scissored around the opponent's head, dragging the opponent into a forced forward somersault as the wrestler falls to the mat.<ref name="nytimes">{{cite web|url=https://www.nytimes.com/2007/11/06/sports/06moolah.html?fta=y|title=Mary Lillian Ellison, 84, the Fabulous Moolah, Is Dead|author=Gold stein, Richard|work=New York Times|access-date=2009-03-25|date=November 6, 2007}}</ref> It is often erroneously called the Hurricanrana in American wrestling, but due to the lack of a double leg cradle pinning combination, it is a standard headscissors takedown.
 
===Handstand headscissors takedown===
This move is performed when the attacking wrestler, in a handstand position, scissors their legs around the opponent's head and follows with the headscissors takedown. There are multiple variations of the handstand headscissors takedown. For example, in one variation, the attacking wrestler rolls forward after scissoring their legs around their opponent's head; in another, the opponent rolls backwards into a handstand position to follow with a headscissors and the takedown.
It is commonly used by [[Kalisto (wrestler)|Kalisto]] and [[Cedric Alexander]]. This move was also popularized by [[Trish Stratus]], who used it as a signature move, called the ''Stratusphere''.
 
===Tilt-a-whirl headscissors takedown===
This move is actually a counter. Usually, the opponent grabs the attacking wrestler (as if he were performing a [[Powerslam#Sidewalk slam|sidewalk slam]]), the attacking counters and swings their body upwards, then scissors their legs around the opponent's head, spins around the opponent's body, and swings their legs downwards, resulting in the headscissors takedown.
 
===Hurricanrana===
Though it is commonly referred to as a ''Hurricanrana'', the original Spanish name for this maneuver is the ''Huracánrana''. The name was taken from its innovator, Mexican luchador [[Huracán Ramírez]]. Sometimes referred to as a reverse victory roll, it is a headscissors takedown that ends in a [[Pin (professional wrestling)#Rana|double leg cradle]] pinning hold.<ref name="COEHurr">{{cite web|url=http://slam.canoe.ca/SlamWrestlingInternational/mexico_nov01-can.html|author=Molinaro, J.|publisher=[[Canadian Online Explorer]]|title=Jericho, Benoit on their time in Mexico - Lucha Libre: A spicy Mexican treat|quote=Huracanrana/Huracarrana - A Frankensteiner finishing in a double leg cradle (rana).|access-date=2007-05-25|date=November 2001}}</ref><ref>Von Erich, Erick. [http://dawrestlingsite.com/wrestling/flashback_reviews/world_class/112886.php "World Class Championship Wrestling - November 28, 1986"]. DaWrestlingSite.com. Retrieved July 25, 2017.</ref> (A rana is any double-leg cradle.) A [[Professional wrestling aerial techniques#Dragonrana|somersault]] version also exists, called the Dragonrana.
 
====Frankensteiner====
This move is derived from the original [[Professional wrestling throws#Hurricanrana|hurricanrana]]. It is described as a head scissors take down that is performed against a running opponent. The wrestler jumps on the shoulders of the charging opponent and performs a back flip. The move varies from the hurricanrana as when the opponent lands - he/she would land on their head as opposed to their back.<ref>{{cite book | author = The Rock and Joe Layden | title = The Rock Says... (p.190) | publisher = Regan Books | year = 2000 | isbn = 978-0-06-039298-7 | quote = I would stand upright and Chris would jump on my shoulders from the front, so that my face would be in his gut and his legs would be hanging over my back. Then he'd do a back flip, landing on his head and arms and dragging me over in the process. In other words, he'd use his legs to hook my head. | url-access = registration | url = https://archive.org/details/rocksaysmostelec00john }}</ref>
 
It was named the "Frankensteiner" by [[Scott Steiner]], who used it as a finishing move.<ref>{{cite web|url=http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0FCO/is_1_3/ai_74010844/pg_2 |title=Big Poppa Is Pumped - wrestler Scott Steiner - Interview |author=Tim Toe |publisher=Wrestling Digest |access-date=2007-06-06 |date=June 2001 |archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20071013154529/http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0FCO/is_1_3/ai_74010844/pg_2 |archive-date=2007-10-13 |url-status=dead }}</ref> The move also has a variation where the opponent is sitting on the top rope, that variation is also referred to as [[Professional wrestling aerial techniques#Frankensteiner|frankensteiner]]. Another variation of the Frankensteiner sees a grounded wrestler first "[[kip-up]]" on to a standing opponent's shoulders, this is where a wrestler rolls on to the back of their shoulders bringing their legs up and kicking forward to build momentum to lift themselves off the floor and on to the standing opponent.
 
=====Reverse frankensteiner=====
Also known as an inverted frankensteiner or a poison rana, this move uses a standard Frankensteiner, but instead of performing the move facing the opponent's face, it is done facing the back of the opponent.
 
====Hurricanrana driver====
The wrestler performs a [[Professional wrestling throws#Headscissors takedown|headscissors takedown]] to a seated or kneeling opponent, driving them head first into the mat. [[Ruby Riott]] and [[Kalisto (wrestler)|Kalisto]] use this move in some of their matches.<ref>{{cite web|last=Boutwell |first=Josh |title=Impact Results - 4/30/09 |url=http://www.wrestleview.com/viewnews.php?id=1241149052 |publisher=Wrestleview |access-date=4 November 2011 |url-status=dead |archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20121002130111/http://www.wrestleview.com/viewnews.php?id=1241149052 |archive-date=2 October 2012 }}</ref><ref>{{cite web|title=Wilkenfeld's TNA Impact report 4/30: Ongoing "virtual time" coverage of Spike TV broadcast|url=http://www.pwtorch.com/artman2/publish/TV_Reports_9/article_31759.shtml|work=Pro Wrestling Torch|access-date=8 November 2011}}</ref><ref>{{cite web|title=Impact Results - 6/10/10|url=http://www.wrestleview.com/viewnews.php?id=1276236624|publisher=Wrestleview|access-date=8 November 2011}}</ref><ref>{{cite web|title=Wilkenfeld's TNA Impact report 6/10: Ongoing "virtual time" coverage of Spike TV broadcast [updated]|url=http://www.pwtorch.com/artman2/publish/tnaimpact/article_41877.shtml|work=Pro Wrestling Torch|access-date=8 November 2011}}</ref>
 
====Rope-aided hurricanrana====
[[File:Mickie James rope aided hurricanrana on Katie Lea live event 2009.jpg|thumb|upright|right|[[Mickie James]] performing an rope-aided hurricanrana on [[Katarina Waters|Katie Lea Burchill]]]]
This maneuver is also known as ''swinging hurricanrana''. The attacking wrestler, beginning on the corner, uses the top ropes for leverage to scissor their legs around the opponent (usually an oncoming opponent) and swings to perform the hurricanrana. This hurricanrana variation was popularized by [[Mickie James]], as she named the move herself ''Mick-a-rana''.
 
==Hip toss==
The wrestler stands next to the opponent with both facing the same direction, and the wrestler hooks their closest arm underneath and behind the opponent's closest armpit. The wrestler then quickly lifts the opponent up with that arm and throws them forward, which would lead the wrestler to flip the opponent on to their back to end the move. There is also a sitout variation, in which the wrestler performs a normal hip toss and then lands in a seated position.
 
==Iconoclasm==
This top rope flipping slam sees a wrestler stand under an opponent, who is situated on the top turnbuckle, turn their back to this opponent while taking hold of the opponent's arms from below, often holding underneath the opponent's arm pits. The wrestler would then throw the opponent forward while falling to a seated position, flipping the opponent over in midair, and slamming them down to the mat back first.<ref name="CIMA">{{cite web|url=http://dgusa.puroresufan.com/typhoon.html |quote=Iconoclasm: Flipping slam from the corner. Has a cross arm version known as the Goriconoslasm |title=Typhoon |publisher=Strong Style Spirit |access-date=May 19, 2007 |year=2007 |archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20070512233826/http://dgusa.puroresufan.com/typhoon.html |archive-date=May 12, 2007 |url-status=dead }}</ref><ref name="DVD">{{cite web |url=http://www.deathvalleydriver.com/bbbowm/part1.htm |title=Death Valley Driver Move List |access-date=2007-07-31 |url-status=dead |archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20130506000024/http://www.deathvalleydriver.com/bbbowm/part1.htm |archive-date=2013-05-06 }}</ref>
 
==Irish whip==
[[File:Snitsky-Irish-Whips-Kendrick,-RLA-Melb-10.11.2007.jpg|thumb|175px|right|[[Gene Snitsky]] Irish whips [[Brian Kendrick]] to the turnbuckle.]]
Also called a hammer throw. A move in which the wrestler grabs one of their opponent's arms and spins, swinging the opponent into an obstacle such as the ring ropes, a turnbuckle, or the stairs leading into the ring. An Irish whip into the ring ropes is usually used to set the opponent up for another technique as he/she bounces off. An Irish whip into the turnbuckles usually sees the opponent remain in the corner, allowing a follow-up attack from the wrestler; the opponent may remain standing or slump to the ground, usually in a seated position, which will vary the attack. One occasional use of the Irish whip is to try to "hit for the cycle" by whipping one's opponent into each corner in turn. Some professional wrestlers can use this move as an advantage by running up the turnbuckle and using a [[Professional wrestling aerial techniques|high flying move]].
 
The move acquired its name due to its association with Irish wrestler, [[Danno O'Mahony]].
 
==Jawbreaker==
A jawbreaker is any move in which the wrestler slams their opponent's jaw against a part of the wrestler's body, usually their knee, head or shoulder.
 
===Shoulder jawbreaker===
Also known as an inverted [[Stunner (professional wrestling)|stunner]], the wrestler stands facing the opponent, places their shoulder under the jaw of the opponent and holds the opponent in place before falling into a sitting or kneeling position, driving the jaw of the opponent into their shoulder.
 
===Sitout jawbreaker===
A standard jawbreaker is seen when a wrestler (either stands facing or not facing opponent) places their head under the jaw of the opponent and holds the opponent in place before falling into a sitting or kneeling position, driving the jaw of the opponent into the top of their head. Sometimes it is also used to counter a headlock by the opponent.
 
===Stunner===
{{main|Stunner (professional wrestling)|l1=Stunner}}
A stunner is a [[professional wrestling holds#Three-quarter facelock|three-quarter facelock]] [[#Jawbreaker|jawbreaker]]. It involves an attacking wrestler applying a three-quarter facelock (reaching behind the head of an opponent, thus pulling the opponent's jaw above the wrestler's shoulder) before falling to a seated position and forcing the defender's jaw to drop down on the shoulder of the attacking wrestler. This move was innovated by [[Mikey Whipwreck]] and popularized by [[Stone Cold Steve Austin]].
 
==Mat slam==
A mat slam is any move in which the wrestler forces the back of the opponent's head into the mat which does not involve a headlock or facelock. If these are used then the move is considered a type of [[DDT (professional wrestling)|DDT]] (if the wrestler falls backwards) or [[#Bulldog|bulldog]]. Some [[neckbreaker]]s also slam the back of the opponent's head into the mat, but the attacker is back-to-back with the attack's receiver. A standard mat slam involves the wrestler grabbing hold of the opponent by their head or hair and pulling back, forcing the back of the opponent's head into the mat.
 
===Belly-to-back inverted mat slam===
[[File:Styles Clash 1!.jpg|thumb|right|200px|alt=|Styles preparing to perform the ''[[#Belly-to-back inverted mat slam|Styles Clash]]'' on [[Matt Hardy]].]]
[[File:Styles Clash 2!.jpg|thumb|right|200px|alt=|Styles performing the ''Styles Clash'' on [[Matt Hardy]].]]
From a position in which the opponent is bent forward against the wrestler's midsection, the wrestler grabs around his or her opponent's midsection and lifts so that the opponent is held upside down, facing in the same direction as the wrestler. The wrestler then hooks both arms of the opponent using his or her legs, and then falls forward planting the opponent's body into the mat face-first. The move often sees the wrestler keep their legs hooked under the arms of the opponent after hitting the move, using the underhooking technique to turn the opponent on to their back into a [[Pinfall (professional wrestling)#Rana|Rana]] style pinning position. This move was innovated by [[Colonel DeBeers|Col. DeBeers]] and was made famous by [[A.J. Styles]], who refers to the move as the ''Styles Clash''. Styles performs the maneuver with a variation, as seen in the photos to the right: he does not hook the opponent's arms before performing the slam, but takes two steps and moves his legs in front of the opponent's arms enabling him to use his legs to cover the shoulders for a pin. This variant is later utilized by former WWE Diva [[Michelle McCool]], who referred to the move as the ''Faith Breaker''. [[Cesaro (wrestler)|Cesaro]] uses a variation called the ''Neutralizer'' where he grapevines the opponents leg with his arm similar to a [[Piledriver (professional wrestling)#Cradle piledriver|cradle piledriver]]. [[El Phantasmo]] uses a cross-arm Variation called CRII, where he lifts his opponent up and he lets him fall face first into the mat.
 
===Double underhook mat slam===
The wrestler faces an opponent, overhooks both arms, and then pivots 180° so that the opponent is facing upwards with his or her head pressed against the upper back or under an arm of the wrestler. The wrestler then drops down to their back, driving the back of the opponent's head and neck into the mat.
 
===Rear mat slam===
As well known as a falling rear mat slam. This move starts with the wrestler standing behind the opponent, and then takes hold of the front of the neck or head, and then falls onto his stomach, driving the opponent's back of the head into the mat first. Another variation of this move sees the wrestler performing a backflip from the top turnbuckle, and as he floats over the opponent, he quickly grabs the opponent's head or neck with both hands and falls on his stomach to complete the rear mat slam.
 
====Sitout rear mat slam====
The wrestler takes hold of their opponent from behind, holding them by either their hair or head. The wrestler then jumps backwards and falls to a sitting position, driving the back of the opponent's head into the ground between their legs. This was a signature move for [[Edge (wrestler)|Edge]], which he called ''Edge-O-Matic''. A variation sees the wrestler run up the corner turnbuckles, perform a backflip over a chasing opponent, and at the same time grab hold of the opponents head and perform the slam.
 
===Sleeper slam===
This slamming version of a headlock takedown sees a wrestler apply a sleeper hold to the opponent, then falls face first to the ground, pulling the opponent down with them and driving the back and head of the opponent into the ground. [[Heath Slater|Heath]] uses a jumping variation of the move. A lifting version also exists, where a wrestler applies a sleeper hold to the opponent, lifts the opponent up and slams the opponent into the ground
 
===Sling Blade===
A spinning sit-out variation of a [[Professional wrestling throws#Sleeper slam|sleeper slam]] that makes use of the wrestler's own momentum. The attacking wrestler starts by running and extending his arm like a [[professional wrestling attacks#Lariat takedown|lariat takedown]] but instead performs a revolution around the opponent's shoulders. This causes the wrestler to switch to his opposite arm before taking his opponent down to the mat while simultaneously landing in a seated position. Another variation involves the wrestler leaping off the ropes before performing the movement. The move is used by [[Hiroshi Tanahashi]], with some commentators even calling the move a 'Tanahashi' when anybody performs it due to how associated it is with him. Other users include [[Pentagon Jr.]], [[JTG]], [[Seth Rollins]], [[Masato Yoshino]] and [[Finn Bálor]], with JTG calling it ''Da Shout Out''.
 
===Tilt-a-whirl mat slam===
As the name suggests the wrestler would first use a [[Professional wrestling holds#Tilt-a-whirl|tilt-a-whirl]] to raise the opponent into a [[Piledriver (professional wrestling)#Reverse piledriver|belly-to-belly (piledriver)]] position, from here the wrestler would fall forward planting the opponent into the mat back-first.
 
==Monkey flip==
This move, often referred to as a monkey climb in British wrestling, involves an attacking wrestler, who is standing face-to-face with an opponent, hooking both hands around the opponent's head before then bringing up both legs so that they place their feet on the hips/waist of the opponent, making the head hold and the wrestlers' sense of balance the only things allowing both wrestlers to be in an upright position. At this point, the attacking wrestler shifts their weight so that they fall backwards to the mat while forcing the opponent to fall forwards with them, only to have the attacking wrestler push up with their legs, forcing the opponent to flip forward, over the wrestler's head and onto their back. This move is most commonly performed out of a ring corner. This is due to it being easier to climb on an opponent while in the corner as balance is easily retained, and it allows the maximum length of ring to propel the opponent across.
 
==Muscle buster==
[[File:Cody rhodes muscle buster.jpg|thumb|[[Cody Rhodes]] performing a Muscle Buster on [[Seth Rollins]].]]
This move is performed when an attacking wrestler hooks both an opponent's legs with their arms and tucks their head in next to the opponent's before standing and lifting the opponent up, so that they are upside down with their head resting on the attacking wrestler's shoulder. From this position, the attacking wrestler jumps up and drops down to the mat, driving the opponent shoulder first down to the mat with the opponent's neck impacting both the wrestler's shoulder and the mat. This can see the wrestler pick up an opponent who is standing but bent forward, but it often begins with an opponent who is sitting on an elevated position, usually on a top turnbuckle, because it is easier to hook and lift an opponent when they are positioned higher than the wrestler. The move also has a [[Neckbreaker#Elevated cradle neckbreaker|neckbreaker variation]], which focuses more of the attack on the opponent's neck. This move originated from the ''[[Kinnikuman]]'' [[manga]], originally known as the Kinniku Buster (''kinniku'' being Japanese for "muscle"), with the move ending with the opponent crashing down on their neck against the attacking wrestler's shoulder. [[Samoa Joe]] used this as one of his finishers (he uses an electric chair version falling backwards, sparing the opponent's neck) until 2015 when he accidentally injured [[Tyson Kidd]], which ended his wrestling career and almost paralyzed him, while [[Ryback]] uses a different variation as his finisher, called ''Shell Shocked'', where he lifts the opponent into position with a [[Suplex#Fisherman's suplex|fisherman's suplex]] and only hooks one of the opponent's legs before running forward and dropping them off his shoulders, in a [[#Samoan drop|Samoan drop]]-esque motion.
 
==Neckbreaker==
{{main|Neckbreaker}}
There are two general categories of neckbreaker, which are related only in that they attack the opponent's neck. One category of neckbreaker is the type of move in which the wrestler slams their opponent's neck against a part of the wrestler's body, usually their knee, head or shoulder. A neckbreaker slam is another technique in which the wrestler throws their opponent to the ground by twisting the opponent's neck.
 
==Piledriver==
{{main|Piledriver (professional wrestling)|l1=Piledriver}}
Whilst giving the illusions of slamming the opponent's head into the ground, a properly executed standard piledriver has the opponent's head barely touching the ground, if at all. The technique is said to have been innovated by [[Wild Bill Longson]].
 
==Powerbomb==
{{main|Powerbomb}}
A powerbomb is a move in which an opponent is lifted into the air and then slammed down back-first to the mat.<ref>{{cite book | author = Mick Foley | title = Have A Nice Day: A Tale of Blood and Sweatsocks (p.242)| publisher = HarperCollins | year = 2000 | isbn = 0-06-103101-1}}</ref> The standard powerbomb sees the opponent placed in a standing headscissors position (bent forward with their head placed between the wrestler's thighs), lifted on the wrestler's shoulders, and slammed back-first down to the mat. The move was innovated by [[Lou Thesz]]. This move was used as a finisher for wrestlers such as [[Dave Bautista|Batista]], [[The Undertaker]], [[Kevin Nash]], [[Chyna]], [[John Layfield|JBL]], among others.
 
==Powerslam==
{{main|Powerslam}}
A powerslam is any slam in which the wrestler performing the technique falls face-down on top of their opponent. The use of the term "powerslam" usually refers to the [[Powerslam#Front powerslam|front powerslam]] and the [[Powerslam#Scoop powerslam|scoop powerslam]].
 
==Pumphandle==
 
===Pumphandle drop===
Also known as a tilt slam or a pumphandle [[Powerslam#Falling powerslam|falling powerslam]], the wrestler stands behind their opponent and bends them forward. One of the opponent's arms is pulled back between their legs and held, while the other arm is hooked. The wrestler then lifts their opponent up until they are parallel with the wrestler's chest, then throws themselves forward, driving the back of the opponent into the ground with the weight of the wrestler atop them.
 
===Pumphandle fallaway slam===
The wrestler hooks up the opponent as a pumphandle slam, then the wrestler goes through the body movements for the fallaway slam, executing the release of the opponent as they enter the apex of the throw, instead of at or just past the apex of the throw like when one executes the [[#Fallaway slam|fallaway slam]]. Usually the opponent then adds effort to gain extra rotations in the air for effect or to ensure that they do not take the bump on their side.
 
===Pumphandle slam===
The wrestler stands behind their opponent and bends them forward. One of the opponent's arms is pulled back between their legs and held, while the other arm is hooked ([[Professional wrestling holds#Pumphandle|pumphandle]]). The attacking wrestler uses the hold to lift the opponent up over their shoulder, while over the shoulder the attacking wrestler would fall forward to slam the opponent against the mat back-first, normally the type of [[powerslam]] delivered is a [[Powerslam#Front powerslam|front powerslam]]. The move can also see other variations of a powerslam used, particularly into a [[Powerslam#Sidewalk slam|sidewalk slam]] position. Ben Davis and Titus Carell use the pumphandle slam as finishers, Davis uses an implant slam calling it The Plantation Punk Slam while Carell uses a spinning slam calling it Spinerella Slam. [[Rhea Ripley]] uses the move itself or a powerbomb version called "Riptide".
 
====Sitout pumphandle slam====
The wrestler lifts the opponent as with a pumphandle slam, but falls to a sitting position and drops the opponent between their legs as with a [[#Michinoku Driver II|michinoku driver II]].
 
==Scoop==
 
===Body slam===
{{Redirect|Body slam}}A body slam is any move in which a wrestler picks up and throws an opponent down to the ground limp back-first. When used by itself, this term generally refers to a very basic variant for a scoop slam.
 
===Scoop slam===
[[File:Scoopslam.jpg|thumb|upright|[[Ivory (wrestler)|Ivory]] setting up to perform a scoop slam on [[Trish Stratus]]]]
Facing their opponent, the wrestler reaches between their opponent's legs with their stronger arm and reaches around their back from the same side with their weaker arm. The wrestler lifts their opponent up and turns them upside down so that they are held up by the wrestler's arm cradling their back. The wrestler then throws the opponent to the ground so that they land on their back. The opponent will often assist the slammer by placing their arm on the slammer's thigh.
 
==Shin breaker==
The wrestler faces the opponent from the side, slightly behind, then tucks their head under the opponent's near armpit and grabs hold of the opponent's near leg, bending it fully. The wrestler then lifts the opponent up and slams them downwards, driving one of the wrestler's knees into the opponent's bent leg. This move is used to weaken the leg for a submission manoeuvre.{{citation needed|date=April 2018}}
 
==Shoulderbreaker==
A shoulderbreaker is any move in which the wrestler slams their opponent's shoulder against any part of the wrestler's body, usually the shin or knee. This move is normally used to weaken the arm for a [[Professional wrestling holds|submission maneuver]] or to make it more difficult for the opponent to kick out of a possible [[pinfall]] attempt. The most common version sees the wrestler turn the opponent upside-down and drop the opponent shoulder-first on the wrestler's knee. Usually the opponent is held over the wrestler's shoulder in either a [[Powerslam#Front powerslam|powerslam]] position, or less commonly an [[Powerbomb#Inverted powerbomb|inverted powerslam]] position for what is sometimes called the inverted shoulderbreaker.
 
==Snake eyes{{anchor|Snake Eyes}}==
This move sees the standing wrestler place the opponent stomach down on their shoulder so that they both are facing the same direction. The attacking wrestler then drops the opponent face-first into the turnbuckle or ropes. This move is most commonly used by [[The Undertaker]]. [[Johnny Gargano]] uses a variation called ''Lawn Dart'', where he throws the opponent face first onto the second turnbuckle.
 
==Snapmare==
With the wrestler's back to the opponent, he/she applies a [[Professional wrestling holds#Three-quarter facelock|three-quarter facelock]] (also known as a cravate) and, either kneeling down or bending over, pulls the opponent forward, flipping them over their shoulder down to the mat, back first. Another variation, sometimes called a "flying mare", sees the wrestler [[Professional wrestling attacks#Hair pull|pull the opponent by the hair]] over their shoulder before slamming them to the mat.<ref name=nytimes/>
 
===Rolling snapmare===
This variation of the snapmare sees the application of the facelock with the takeover to the opponent, but rather than the wrestler remaining stationary, he rolls with the opponent's momentum.
 
===Snapmare driver===
A high impact variation of the snapmare where instead of flipping the opponent over, the wrestler drops down either on their chest or down on their knees and drives the opponent's head down to the mat forehead first, with the [[Professional wrestling holds#Three-quarter facelock|three-quarter facelock]] much like a [[cutter (wrestling)#cutter|cutter]]. An inverted variation of this move also exists. However, the wrestler holds their opponent's head in a back to back position, before performing the move. [[Adam Rose]] used this as the ''Party Foul''. [[Melina Perez|Melina]] used this move after her return in 2010, most notably to win her second [[WWE Divas Championship|Diva's championship]] at [[SummerSlam (2010)|SummerSlam 2010]].
 
===Snapmare neckbreaker===
A high impact combination of the snapmare and the falling neckbreaker. With the wrestler's back to the opponent, he/she applies a [[Professional wrestling holds#Three-quarter facelock|three-quarter facelock]] and then pulls the opponent forward, flipping them over their shoulder, before turning to land in a [[neckbreaker]]. Was briefly used as a signature by Tyson Kidd.
 
==Spinebuster==
The wrestler starts by facing their opponent and then grabs them around their waist, lifts them up, and then either slams the opponent down while landing on top of them, or tosses them forward on to their back. Although it can be used on a stationary opponent, it is usually performed against a charging opponent, using the opponent's own [[momentum]] to make the throw more powerful.
 
=== Double leg slam ===
[[File:Hardcore Holly Alabama Slam.jpg|thumb|[[Hardcore Holly]] executing the Alabama Slam.|alt=]]
Also called the Alabama Slam. This variation of the spinebuster starts with the wrestler facing his opponent. The wrestler catches and grabs the opponent from either his waist or both legs, and lifts the opponent so he would either face the mat while being vertically elevated off the mat (with both his legs grabbed over the wrestler's shoulders) or literally facing the wrestler's back while being lifted upside down with the wrestler still taking hold of both the opponent's legs (back-to-belly position). The wrestler then tosses the opponent overhead by throwing both the opponent's legs forward, slamming the opponent back-first. A sitout or inverted version is also possible. This move was popularized by [[Hardcore Holly]] and named after his fictional hometowns of [[Talladega, Alabama|Talladega]] and later [[Mobile, Alabama]].
 
===Sitout spinebuster===
[[File:Titus O'Neil Spinebuster.jpg|thumb|[[Titus O'Neil]] executing the ''Clash of the Titus'' (Sitout spinebuster) on [[Heath Slater]]]]
The wrestler starts by facing his opponent. He then grabs the opponent around the waist or under the arms, lifts him up, and tosses him forward on to his back or slams him down while dropping to a seated position.<ref name="DVD" /> The wrestler hangs on to the opponents legs for a pin-fall attempt. This move is used as a finisher by [[Titus O'Neil]] who calls it the ''Clash of the Titus''. A slight variation is the sitout side slam spinebuster where the opponent is lifted like a [[Powerslam#Side slam|side slam]] but dropped into a sitout spinebuster.<ref>{{cite web|last=Keller|first=Wade|title=Keller's ECW on Sci-Fi 8/22: Sabu vs. Big Show rematch, Punk vs. Anderson, Thorn vs. Balls|url=http://pwtorch.com/artman2/publish/TV_Reports_9/article_17725.shtml|work=Pro Wrestling Torch|access-date=4 November 2011}}</ref>
 
===Spinning spinebuster===
This version of the spinebuster sees the wrestler lifting the opponent, turning 180°, and then slam him or her forward on to his or her back or slam him or her down while landing on top of him or her. It is usually performed against a charging opponent, using the opponent's own [[momentum]] to make the throw more powerful, but can also be performed against a stationary opponent. Innovated and popularized by [[Arn Anderson]], this version is also known as a ''Double A Spinebuster'' in tribute to Anderson.
 
===Thrust spinebuster===
This variation of the spinebuster sees the wrestler lift the opponent by their waist as in the standard version, but then place their dominant hand onto the opponent's chest in order to slam them, similarly to a [[chokeslam]]. There is also a variation of this move in which the wrestler stands besides his or her opponent, grabs their waist as in a [[Powerslam#Side slam|side slam]], and then hooks the opponent's leg with his or her free arm before lifting and slamming the opponent. The release variation was popularized by Ron Simmons.
 
==Suplex==
{{main|Suplex}}
A suplex is the same as the amateur suplex, a throw which involves arching/bridging either overhead or twisting to the side, so the opponent is slammed to the mat back-first. Though there are many variations, the term suplex (without qualifiers) can also refer specifically to the [[Suplex#Vertical suplex|vertical suplex]].
 
==Trips and sweeps==
 
===Armbar legsweep===
The wrestler stands beside their opponent to either side, crosses their arm against the opponent's opposite hand in front of it (as the wrestler stands beside the opponent, and uses for example their right arm, they would cross it against the opponent's left arm, and vice versa). From this point, the wrestler places their leg in front of the opponent's opposite leg, and falls backwards, causing the opponent's arm to be slammed into the mat.
 
===Cobra clutch legsweep===
The wrestler places his opponent in the [[Professional wrestling holds#Cobra clutch|cobra clutch]], then stands to one side of the opponent, hooks their nearest foot behind their opponent's nearest leg and throws themselves backwards, forcing their opponent backwards to the ground.
 
===Double leg takedown===
{{see also|Takedown (grappling)#Double leg takedown|l1=Double leg takedown}}
A tackle where the intention is to force the opponent down on their back by tackling them at their waist or upper thighs. This usually involves grabbing the opponent with both arms around the opponent's legs while keeping the chest close to the opponent, and using this position to force the opponent to the floor .
 
==={{anchor|Dragon screw}}Dragon screw legwhip===
Dragon screw legwhip (or simply Dragon screw) is a legwhip where a wrestler grabs an opponent's leg and holds it parallel to the mat while they are facing each other. The attacking wrestler then spins the leg inwards causing the opponent to fall off balance and twist in the air bringing them to the ground in a turning motion. It is used by the "''Ace of the Universe"'' [[Hiroshi Tanahashi]]
 
===Drop toe-hold===
The wrestler falls to the ground, placing one foot at the front of the opponent's ankle and the other in the back of the calf. This causes the opponent to fall face first into the ground. It is sometimes used illegally to force an opponent into a chair or other elevated weapon; it is also used occasionally to force an opponent face-first into the turnbuckles, stunning them momentarily.
 
===Half nelson legsweep===
The wrestler stands behind, slightly to one side of and facing the opponent. The wrestler reaches under one of the opponent's arms with their corresponding arm and places the palm of their hand on the neck of the opponent, thereby forcing the arm of the opponent up into the air (the half nelson). The wrestler then uses their other arm to pull the opponent's other arm behind the opponent's head, so both opponent's arms are pinned. The wrestler then hooks the opponent's near leg and throws themselves backwards, driving the opponent back-first to the ground.
 
===Russian legsweep===
[[File:Damien Sandow Russian Leg.jpg|thumb|275px|[[Damien Sandow]] performing a Russian Legsweep on [[Rob Van Dam]].]]
Also known as a side Russian legsweep and called a neckbreaker by [[Gorilla Monsoon]]. This is a move in which a wrestler stands side-to-side and slightly behind with the opponent, facing in the same direction, and reaches behind the opponent's back to hook the opponent's head with the other hand extending the opponent's nearest arm, then while hooking the opponent's leg the wrestler falls backward, pulling the opponent to the mat back-first. There is also a jumping variation of the Russian legsweep, which is similar in execution to that of the [[Facebuster#Leaping reverse STO|leaping reverse STO]] and different modified versions of the move.
 
====Forward Russian legsweep====
The wrestler grabs the opponent by the arm and goes behind him while holding the arm and hooking the opponent's leg. The wrestler then bends the opponent's back and slams their face to the mat. The forward Russian legsweep was popularized by [[Jeff Jarrett]], who began using the maneuver as a finisher in the late 1990s and calls it ''The Stroke''.
 
=====Full nelson forward Russian legsweep=====
A slight variation of the forward Russian legsweep, the wrestler approaches the opponent from behind and places them in a [[Nelson hold#Full nelson|full nelson]] before hooking their leg. The wrestler then falls forward in an almost identical way, slamming the opponent face-first into the mat. The most notable practitioner of this variant is [[The Miz]], who calls the move the ''Skull Crushing Finale'' and has used it as a finisher since August 2009.
 
====Three-quarter facelock Russian legsweep====
The wrestler stands in front of, facing away from and slightly to one side of the opponent. The wrestler then reaches behind themselves and applies a [[Professional wrestling holds#Three-quarter facelock|three-quarter facelock]] to the opponent. The wrestler then hooks the opponent's near leg with their own near leg and sweeps the leg away, simultaneously throwing themselves backwards, thus driving the opponent to the ground (with the weight of the wrestler on top of them) and wrenching the opponent's neck.
 
===Schoolboy sweep===
{{see also|Pin (professional wrestling)#Schoolboy}}
This technique gives its name to the [[bump (professional wrestling)|schoolboy bump]] and is performed when the wrestler gets behind their opponent, drops down to their knees, puts their hand through the opponent's legs, hooking the opponent's hips, and pulls backwards. This pulls the opponent backwards, with straightened and trapped legs, forcing the opponent to fall backwards, over the wrestler, flat on the floor.
 
===STO===
The STO (Space Tornado Ogawa) is a sweep in which a wrestler wraps one arm across the chest of their opponent and sweeps the opponent's leg with their own leg to slam the other wrestler back-first. This can also be a lariat-legsweep combination to slam down the opponent. This is also a move used often in Judo and in other grappling martial arts. This maneuver can be used running and standing. Innovated by Japanese silver medalist judoka [[Naoya Ogawa]]. Used by [[Evil (wrestler)|Evil]] as ''Evil.''
 
====Arm Trap Cradle Somersault STO====
The wrestler faces the opponent, ducks under the opponent's arm closest to them, wraps their closest arm around the waist of the opponent and then quickly performs a forward flip whilst sweeping the opponent's leg, thereby dropping the opponent on their back, ending up in a [[Pin (professional wrestling)#Cradle|cradle pin]].<ref>{{cite web|title=WWE Superstar TV report from last week|url=http://www.f4wonline.com/more/more-top-stories/96-wwe/22797-wwe-superstar-tv-report-from-last-week|work=Wrestling Observer|access-date=5 November 2011}}</ref><ref>{{cite web|last=Twilling|first=Rich|title=/23 Twilling's WWE Over the Limit PPV report: John Cena vs. Batista in an I Quit match for the WWE Championship, Jack Swagger vs. Big Show for the World Heavyweight Championship, Edge vs. Randy Orton|url=http://www.prowrestling.net/artman/publish/WWEPPVreports/5_23_Twilling_s_WWE_Over_the_Limit_PPV_report_John_Cena_vs_Batista_in_an_I_Quit_match_for_the_WWE_Championship_Jack_Swagger_vs_Big_Show_for_the_World_Heavyweight_Championship_Edge_vs_Randy_Orton_printer.shtml|publisher=Prowrestling.net|access-date=8 November 2011}}</ref><ref>{{cite web|last=Woodward|first=Buck|title=Full WWE Over the Limit results|url=http://www.pwinsider.com/article/47765/full-wwe-over-the-limit-results.html?p=1|publisher=PWInsider}}</ref> This move was innovated by [[Madoka (wrestler)|Madoka]] as ''Ranhei''. It was also made popular by [[Kofi Kingston]], who calls it the ''S.O.S''.
 
====Chokehold STO====
[[File:Shelly martinez Chokehold STO.jpg|thumb|[[Shelly Martinez]] executing the ''FTS'' (chokehold STO) on Alexia Nicole.]]
This move is an STO where the wrestler would first apply a [[Professional wrestling holds#Single arm choke|chokehold]] with one hand before sweeping their opponent's leg. [[Alexa Bliss]] uses this as a signature move, normally followed by her rope-assisted repeated stomps.
 
====Front facelock STO====
This variation of the STO sees the attacker apply a [[Professional wrestling holds#Front facelock|front facelock]] on his opponent and sweeping the opponent's leg and falling forward, with the opponent landing on his neck and shoulders. A pinning variation also exists where the attacker keeps the front facelock applied as he covers the opponent slightly.
 
====Reverse STO====
Well known as the Complete Shot or Flatliner, this is a move in which a wrestler stands side-to-side and slightly behind with the opponent, facing in the opposite direction, and reaches around the opponent's torso with one arm across the opponent's chest with their hand holding on to their other hand which is behind the opponent's head. The wrestler then falls backward, driving the opponent into the mat face-first. The wrestler can also cross their leg between the opponent's leg before hitting the reverse STO, with this slight variation being known as a leg hook reverse STO.It was innovated by [[Gedo (wrestler)|Gedo]].
 
=====Arm trap reverse STO=====
This move sees the wrestler stand side to side with the opponent, tucking his arm behind the opponent's head at a 90° angle and putting his near leg in front of the opponent's closest leg. The wrestler then pushes the opponent forward and quickly pulls them backward, with the attacker landing on their back whilst the opponent falls face first.
 
=====Elevated reverse STO=====
In this variation the wrestler first locks the opponent in a standard Reverse STO lock, then sees the opponent and put his ankles on some elevated surface (usually top rope, or turnbuckle, or barricade outside of the ring), the wrestler then falls backward, driving the opponent face-first into the mat. Another variation of this move including the opponent standing on the apron outside of the ring, and attacking wrestler first grabs opponent and pulls him over the top rope until opponent's ankles match the ropes, the attacking wrestler then falls backward, driving the opponent face-first into the mat. [[Tommaso Ciampa]] used this move at [[NXT TakeOver: Toronto (2016)|NXT TakeOver: Toronto]] in a match against [[Scott Dawson (wrestler)|Scott Dawson]].
=====Gory Special Swinging Reverse STO=====
The wrestler locks a back-to-back backbreaker submission in (better known as the ''Gory Special'') and then drops the opponent into a Swinging Reverse STO. Popularized by [[Brian Cage]] as ''Weapon X''.
 
=====Leaping reverse STO=====
A variation of the reverse STO, this move see the wrestler jumping up towards the side of an opponent and grabbing his head before falling backwards onto the mat, planting the opponent face-first. The move has been used by various professional wrestlers such as [[Ricky Banderas|Mil Muertes]] (the ''Flatliner''), [[Shelton Benjamin]] (the ''Paydirt''), [[Montel Vontavious Porter]] (the ''Play of the Day/305'') and [[R-Truth]] (''Lil' Jimmy'').
 
=====Lifting reverse STO=====
A slight variation of the reverse STO, this move sees a wrestler perform exactly the same set-up but instead of falling backward immediately, they lift the opponent before dropping them face-first into the mat, making it similar to a [[Professional wrestling throws#Flapjack|flapjack]]. It was innovated by [[Chris Kanyon]]. [[Baron Corbin]]'s finisher is a variant of this move called the ''End of Days'' while [[Angelina Love]] uses the move as a signature (previously a finisher) called ''Lights Out''. Another variation of this move involves using a pumphandle lift where the wrestler sets the opponent up for a pumphandle hold and then lifts them into the execution of the move. [[Pete Dunne]] uses this variation as a finisher previously calling it ''Drop Dead'' but now known as the ''Bitter End''.
 
=====Swinging reverse STO=====
Another variation of the reverse STO, this move sees a wrestler grab their opponent around their neck and lean them backwards. The wrestler then swings their opponent around, slamming them face-first into the mat. [[Bray Wyatt]] uses this maneuver as his finisher, which he calls ''Sister Abigail''. NJPW wrestler Switchblade [[Jay White]] uses a variation called ''Blade Runner''. [[Mike Knox|Knux]] calls it ''The Knuxout''. [[Alexa Bliss]] currently uses this move as a finisher but with a different twist.
 
==See also==
*[[Professional wrestling holds]]
*[[Professional wrestling attacks]]
*[[Professional wrestling aerial techniques]]
*[[Professional wrestling double-team maneuvers]]
*[[Professional wrestling strikes]]-->
 
== Izvori ==